Monday, 30 May 2011

ASH BOWLING GREEN - THE FIRST 100 YEARS

Congratulations to Ash Bowling Club, which celebrates 100 years of bowling in the village this weekend. The club's bowling green, in Moat Lane, was opened on June 6, 1911.
The club was formed in June 1910, when the first general meeting was held and officers elected. The annual membership fee was five shillings (25p) in modern money. But agricultural labourers in the area then earned only 13 shiliings and fourpence (67p) a week!
Centenary celebrations - including a dinner and invitation tournament are planned for July 1,2 and 3.
For a brief history of the club, compiled by its members, go here.

Wednesday, 11 May 2011

COMING SOON: THE SNOWDOWN MALE VOICE CHOIR

Saturday July 9 , Ash Heritage Group presents...
THE SNOWDOWN MALE VOICE CHOIR
7.30p.m. IN ST NICHOLAS CHURCH
Tickets £5 on the door or reserved beforehand.
Phone: 01304 812121
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Here's some background about the choir (pictured, right), from its website (www.snowdown-choir.co.uk)...

The opening of the new Kent coalfield, at the start of the 20th century, brought miners from all over Britain, anxious to find work. Many were from south Wales and Yorkshire, and brought with them

strong choral traditions. Soon the collieries at Snowdown, Betteshanger, Tilmanstone and Chislet all boasted male voice choirs. In 1948, all four combined to give a concert at the Royal Albert Hall in London. Sadly, the Snowdown Choir is now the only one left.
The Snowdown Choir was formed in 1929 by John Yorath, a Welshman, who was the choir-master of St Peter's Church Aylesham, and the choir has now been based in the village for 80 years. In this time the choir has given more than 2000 concerts, at venue as small as Tilmanstone church and as large as the Albert Hall, in towns and villages in England and Wales, as well as France, Belgium and Holland. The choir has raised an estimated £750,000 for worthy causes.
Although originally a miners' choir, the closure of the coalfield means that it now draws members from all walks of life and from a wide area of Kent.